A six-bedroom Scottish home with its own private temple has gone on the market for the same price as a two-bedroom flat in London and could be the perfect pad for city dwellers hunting tranquility. 

Craigiehall Temple, located west of capital Edinburgh, boasts a private temple with an extensive garden and far-reaching views of the surrounding countryside.

It is on the market with an asking price of £895,000 – the same price as a two-bedroom flat in central London, where prices tend to be higher than most other parts of the country.

Craigiehall Temple in Scotland is a property that includes a six-bed house as well as a private temple

Craigiehall Temple in Scotland is a property that includes a six-bed house as well as a private temple

The circular stone temple dates back to 1759, but was added to in 1996 and was further extended in 2005

The circular stone temple dates back to 1759, but was added to in 1996 and was further extended in 2005

With coronavirus having restricting people to their homes for months, there has been a spike in interest among people wanting to move out of the middle of cities and this property could fit the bill – it is within easy reach of Edinburgh, but enough on the outskirts to be peaceful.

Estate agent Savills reported last month that people are craving more space both at home and outdoors as they look to move out of cities into the countryside.

It said 40 per cent of house hunters would now like to live in a village, shifting focus away from traditional favourites, such as walking distance to the station.

With this in mind, Craigiehall Temple could prove to be the perfect solution due to its countryside setting and its cost being the same as a flat in London’s Pimlico.

Inside the temple: The property's tower is across two floors, with a living area on the ground floor

Inside the temple: The property’s tower is across two floors, with a living area on the ground floor

The temple has stone walls, wooden flooring and a grand fireplace on the ground floor

The temple has stone walls, wooden flooring and a grand fireplace on the ground floor 

There is a long drive approaching the tower and the main house at Scotland's Craigiehall Temple

There is a long drive approaching the tower and the main house at Scotland’s Craigiehall Temple

The entrance to Craigiehall Temple is via an impressive glazed hallway, which provides access to both the main house and to the private temple.

The property’s tower is across two floors, with a living area on the ground floor linked via a spiral stone staircase to the bedroom and en-suite shower room on the upper level.

The circular stone temple dates back to 1759, but was added to in 1996 and was further extended in 2005.

The extended area includes hand-cut Cullalo stone sourced from Stirling, as well as reclaimed Scottish slate for the roof.

The upper floor includes this grand bedroom with a large fireplace and several windows - including one in the ceiling

The upper floor includes this grand bedroom with a large fireplace and several windows – including one in the ceiling

Time out: The fireplace in the bedroom has chairs placed either side to sit and relax

Time out: The fireplace in the bedroom has chairs placed either side to sit and relax

The ground floor in the temple is linked to the upper level via this spiral stone staircase

The ground floor in the temple is linked to the upper level via this spiral stone staircase

Ralph Hendrie Legal, the estate agent handling the sale, explained in its marketing literature for the property: ‘The original tower has an interesting history, having been originally constructed in 1759.

‘Craigiehall Temple was also known as The Leny Temple and still features a pillared portico by Sir William Bruce, the architect of the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

‘The architectural value of the Temple lies mainly in its portico. Bruce designed it for the fine mansion of Craigiehall just across the River Almond which he built for the second Earl of Annandale whose arms are carved above the entrance.’

There are far-reaching views of the surrounding countryside from the balcony at the main house

There are far-reaching views of the surrounding countryside from the balcony at the main house

The architectural value of the Temple lies mainly in its portico, according to the estate agent Ralph Hendrie Legal

The architectural value of the Temple lies mainly in its portico, according to the estate agent Ralph Hendrie Legal

The main house is also spread across two floors. However, it is arranged as an ‘upside down’ home, meaning that the living rooms are on the upper floor and the bedrooms are on the lower floor.

It is arranged in this way to make the most of the far-reaching views across the surrounding countryside.

The upper floor houses two living rooms, with access to a large balcony as well as a spacious kitchen with granite worktops and oak hand-built cabinets.

The kitchen also has sliding doors, providing access to a second balcony on that level.

The main house is an 'upside down' home, with the living rooms - including the kitchen - on the upper floor

The main house is an ‘upside down’ home, with the living rooms – including the kitchen – on the upper floor

This large living area in the main house has access to two separate balconies on the upper floor

 This large living area in the main house has access to two separate balconies on the upper floor

The ground level of the main house has three bedrooms with en-suites, and two further bedrooms

The ground level of the main house has three bedrooms with en-suites, and two further bedrooms

The ground level has three bedrooms with en-suites, along with two further bedrooms – one of which is currently used as a home office.

Zoopla’s Tom Parker said: ‘This unique property is truly one of a kind. It offers a rare combination with the original temple, built in 1759, bringing a wealth of character and the more modern extension providing a perfect family home.

‘Ideal for someone looking for an easy commute into Edinburgh, it provides a tempting proposition for those searching for a house steeped in history, but with minimal associated costs and maintenance.’

TWO-BED IN LONDON FOR £895K

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