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irst it was the friend who joined the great migration to the North. Wherever she goes in her new town, if she mentions she’s just moved from London people ask if she’s finding everything cheap.

Apparently new arrivals are ingratiating themselves with the locals by chirruping about bargain beauty treatments and pints for a pittance, unaware that one man’s praise is another’s galling sense that their hard-earned treats feel two-a-penny for soft Southerners.

Next, a pal from Margate started bemoaning the latest wave of transplants to the trendy seaside town.

Arriving with hefty work-from-home London salaries and, traumatised by the capital’s house prices and ignorant of their new environs, they’re offering five times the local average for homes in the area. The agents have £££s in their eyes.

All this is playing out against a backdrop of headlines about towns from St Ives to Whitby pushing back against second homeowners, while Michael Gove is proposing new powers for regional mayors to crackdown on short-term lets.

There is a widespread fear, borne out in the statistics, of the epic post-pandemic relocation of Londoners around the UK pushing up rents and house prices and exacerbating housing shortages in beauty spots.

But while behaving like some flash git from London is unlikely to win you many friends, individuals can’t really be blamed for rising house prices.

After all, most Londoners have themselves been pushed to move by unaffordable housing.

While it’s easy to see how these stresses become personal – behaving like some flash git from London is unlikely to win you many friends – individuals can’t really be blamed for rising house prices. After all, most Londoners have been pushed to move by unaffordable housing too.

There’s no moral imperative not to move somewhere you can afford a nicer lifestyle and a bigger home and you are not singlehandedly causing a housing crisis by doing so. The reasons for that are many, varied and largely structural and political.

That said, if you are planning to make a move, whether to the Cotswolds, Cumbria or Cambridge, one simple rule will help ease the transition: don’t be a dick.

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